McMaster University
Welcome to the Department of Kinesiology Print E-mail
 

Vision

Our vision is to be the leading undergraduate and graduate Kinesiology program in Canada and among the world's best in strategic areas of strength through innovation and excellence in research, teaching and service.

Detailed vision statement click here

Mission

Our mission is the discovery, communication and application of knowledge through the multi-disciplinary study of human movement, exercise and the relationships between physical activity and health. This approach incorporates biological, psychological, sociological, historical, organizational and professional practice perspectives. We aim to inspire a passion for lifelong learning and discovery, and strive to prepare our students to become leaders and valued members of society.

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Latest News and Events


Martin Gibala

CrossFit controversy: Do the benefits outweigh the risks?

read more

 
Martin Gibala

Fitness Crazed

from The New York Times.  read more

 
Martin Gibala

“Exercise for health: Does workout intensity matter”?

Health Advisor column from The Globe and Mail.  read more

 
Kinesiology Graduate Student Research Conference

Friday May 16, 2014
8:30am to 3:30pm
David Braley Athletic Centre, Fitzhenry Room, W202, 203

pdfFULL CONFERENCE PROGRAM
Graduate student speakers and, presenters explained the core of their research ideas and how they pertain to the health and well being of the public.  Members of the PACE community programs attended and engaged in the discussions expressing clear expectations and in depth appreciation for the work in which these young scientists are engaged.   The intention is that this knowledge translation conference will become an annual event.

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Martin Gibala

What's the best way to quickly get game fit? 

Listen to Radio CaptainU for the interview

 
Matthew Stork, SSHRC Storyteller

Second year Master's student, Matthew Stork, is one of the 25 finalists in the 2nd annual national SSHRC Storytellers Competition.  A variant on the 3 minute thesis theme, the SSHRC Storytellers Competition required graduate students to provide narrative submissions, in no more than 300 words or 3 minutes of multimedia content, on how their SSHRC funded research is making an impact on people's lives.

Matthew's research investigates the role of self-control in achieving social and academic success among first year university students.  Matt hopes to develop and implement self-control training programs to enhance student learning, studying, social habits, and academic performance.

Read more...