COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE I PSYCH3BN3 Course Outline Fall 2017, Term I

NOTE: Please consult the online version of this course outline, and "refresh" your browser, as this page will be updated throughout the semester with links to readings, lecture outlines and student presentations, at www.science.mcmaster.ca/pnb/department/psych3bn3



Instructor

Professor Sue Becker, becker (at mcmaster dot ca)
Office hours: by appointment.

Course Assistance - TAs:

Lauren Smail, smaillc (at mcmaster dot ca)
Craig Hutton, huttoncp (at mcmaster dot ca)

Schedule

Mondays 9:30-11:20, Thursdays 9:30-10:20. Change of room: BSB-117

Course Objectives

This course will survey findings in several major areas of cognitive neuroscience, using a range of methods including brain imaging, neural network modelling, and behavioural testing of neuropsychological patients, toward an understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying cognition. Lectures will cover both textbook chapters and 20 selected readings from the current literature. Students are expected to develop an appreciation for the range of techniques used by cognitive neuroscientists, when they are applicable, and what they tell us about a range of cognitive and brain functions, as well as an ability to evaluate critically the scientific literature.

During the first three weeks, introductory material will be covered in a traditional lecture format. In subsequent weeks, for each of the 5 major topic areas, there will be a one-hour introductory lecture given by the instructor followed by four hours of paper presentations and discussions, with the papers presented by students, and the instructor and TA's directing and facilitating the discussions.

Materials and Fees

1. Course text: Cognitive Neuroscience: The Biology of the Mind, 4th Edition, By M.S. Gazzaniga, R.B. Ivry and G.R. Mangun, NY: W.W. Norton & Company, 2013.

2. 20 articles from the recent literature (see online version of syllabus).

To promote a high quality of in-class discussion, students are expected to have at least skimmed every paper before class, and to have read in great detail the 3 or more papers for which they are writing critiques.

The readings are freely available electronically from the McMaster library web pages (accessible from any on-campus computer). For your convenience, links to these online resources are included below (or will be added soon!).

Overview and Assessment

In extreme cases such as after an unanticipated university closure it may be necessary to revise the assessment scheme detailed below. The instructor reserves the right to modify elements of the assessment scheme as required and will provide students with as much prior notification and consusltation as possible, both in class and on the course website.

In case of a change in course enrolment, the instructor reserves the right to re-assign student's paper presentations, within 4 weeks of the presentation date.
Participation 10%
At least three 2-page critiques of papers (best 3 count) 30%
One 20-30 minute oral presentation 20%
One final take-home exam 40%

Participation

Marks for participation are based on 1) providing feedback to other students on their presentations, by filling out a very brief evaluation form at the end of each presentation, and 2) contributing to the class discussions of the 20 papers. The participation mark will be calculated as follows:
  • Attendance at all presentations and Feedback provided to presenters: 1 mark for submitting 1-4 feedback forms with informative and helpful feedback, 2 marks for 5-8 forms, 3 marks for 9-12, 4 marks for 13-16, and 5 marks for 17 or more.
  • Contribution to discussions: 1 mark for contributing in a substantial way (not just asking clarification type questions) to 1 paper discussion, 2 marks for 2-3, 3 marks for 4-7, 4 marks for 8-11, 5 marks for 12 or more.

Critiques

Students will each be randomly assigned 5 papers covering all 5 topic areas. Of those 5, they can choose at least 3 papers to critique, but the first critique (Learning and Memory topic) is NON-OPTIONAL. No matter how many critiques are turned in, only the best 3 scores will be counted. Critiques are due at the start of class on the day the paper is being presented. Hard-copy only.

Late critiques submitted after the paper has been presented in class will not be accepted under any circumstances.

Please read the guidelines and marking scheme for critiques on this link.

Examples of well written critiques by a student who previously took Psych3BN3 can be found here: DC-Critique3.docx, DC-Critique4.docx, DC-Critique5.docx.

Presentations

Each student will be assigned a paper to be presented. Depending on course enrolment, each presentation will be either given individually or by a pair of students. Students' requests to present individually or with a specific partner will be accommodated whenever possible but cannot be guaranteed. In either case, you (as an individual or pair of presenters) must meet with your instructor at least 1 week prior to your presentation date. Your outline is due at the time of this meeting and should include a point-form summary of what you consider to be the most important points in the article (intro, methods, results and discussion). For pair presentations, your outlines can either be written individually, each covering their own section, or jointly covering both students' parts of the presentation and will be marked as an individual or joint piece of work accordingly.

Two examples of outstanding presentations by past Psych3BN3 students can be found on this link (pdf file) and this link (pdf file) .

Please read the guidelines and marking scheme for presentations on this link.

The assignment of critiques and paper presentation dates can be found at this link (pdf file).

Final exam

The final exam will be distributed during the regular final exam period. It is expected to take no more than one day to complete, but students will be given 1 week in order to fit this in around their other exams. There will be 5 exam questions, one per major topic area covered in the course, and students will be asked to provide (max 2 pages each, double-spaced) answers to 4 of the 5 questions.

Sample final exam questions from previous years can be found on this link.

Policy on missed work, extensions and late penalties

Late assignments will not be accepted unless for valid medical or extenuating personal reasons, in which case a make-up assignment may be assigned in lieu of the missed work, at the instructor's discretion. In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar “Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work”. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015.

Missed presentations due to illness: In case a student misses his/her presentation, an alternative make-up presentation topic will be assigned. The last 2-3 class hours at the end of term will be reserved for make-up presentations.

Academic Integrity

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: .Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty.), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to McMaster's http://www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity.

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one.s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Academic accommodation of students with disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Weekly Outline of Lecture topics, readings, and links to lecture outlines

(outlines to be added approximately 24 hours before each lecture. Readings to be finalized within the next few days. ) At certain points in the course it may make good sense to modify the schedule outlined below. The instructor reserves the right to modify elements of the course and will notify students accordingly, both in class and by posting any changes to the course website.

Introductory Lectures 1-9

Sept 7, 11, 11, 14, 18, 18, 21, 25, 25: Course overview, Introduction to the nervous system, and cognitive neuroscience methods.
Readings: Chapters 1-3 in Gazzaniga textbook.
Lecture 1, Sept 7: Course overview
Lectures 2-3, Sept 11: team-building activity, History of cognitive neuroscience, Discuss presentations. Reading: Chapter 1.
(pdf file), (printer friendly pdf)
Lecture 4, Chapter 2 part 1 (up to p35), Sept 14. (pdf file), (printer friendly pdf)
Lecture 5, Chapter 2 part 2 (p35 to end of chapter), Sept 18, (pdf file), (printer friendly pdf)
Lecture 6, chapter 3 (up to p82), part I, Sept 18, (pdf file), (printer friendly pdf)
Lecture 7, chapter 3 (p85-94), part II, Sept 21, (pdf file)
Lecture 8, chapter 3 (p95-111), part III, Sept 25, (pdf), (printer friendly pdf)
Lecture 9, chapter 3 (p111 to end of chapter), part IV, Computational Models, Sept 25, (pdf), (printer friendly pdf)
Additional background reading for Lecture 8:
  1. Mahmoudi et al (2012) Multi-voxel pattern analysis for fMRI data: A review. Computational and Mathematical Models in Medicine.
Additional background readings for Lecture 9:
  1. Hinton (1989) "Connectionist learning procedures",Artificial Intelligence 40:185-234 http://www.cs.toronto.edu/~hinton/absps/clp.pdf
  2. Rogers & McClelland (2005), "A parallel distributed processing approach to semantic cognition: Applications to conceptual development". In Gershkoff-Stowe & Rakison (Eds), Building Object Categories in Developmental Time. http://psych.stanford.edu/~jlm/papers/RogersMcCIPSympChap.pdf

Topic 1: Learning and memory

Link to lecture outline: (pdf), (print friendly pdf)
Readings:
  • Sept 28 (lecture)
    Chapter 9 in Gazzaniga book.
  • LM1 Oct 2
    Oyarzun, Javiera P, et al. "Targeted Memory Reactivation during Sleep Adaptively Promotes the Strengthening or Weakening of Overlapping Memories." The Journal of neuroscience 37.32 (2017):7748-7758.
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Link to Sabrina and Ibrahim's presentation: pdf
  • LM2 Oct 2
    Schapiro, Anna C, et al. "Complementary learning systems within the hippocampus: a neural network modelling approach to reconciling episodic memory with statistical learning." Philosophical transactions - Royal Society. Biological sciences 372.1711 (2017)
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Link to Patrick and Supriya's presentation: pdf
  • LM3 Oct 5
    L Iyadurai, SE Blackwell, R Meiser-Stedman, PC Watson, MB Bonsall, JR Geddes, AC Nobre and EA Holmes (2017) Molecular Psychiatry. Preventing intrusive memories after trauma via a brief intervention involving Tetris computer game play in the emergency department: a proof-of-concept randomized controlled trial.
    Link to Open access article
    Link to Louisa and Sarah's presentation: pdf
  • LM4 Oct 16
    Deadwyler, Sam A, et al. "A cognitive prosthesis for memory facilitation by closed-loop functional ensemble stimulation of hippocampal neurons in primate brain." Experimental neurology 287.Pt 4 (2017):452-460.
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Link to Aleeza and Sarah's presentation: pdf

Topic 2: Cerebral lateralization

Link to lecture outline: (pdf) (print friendly pdf)
Readings:
  • October 16 (lecture)
    1. Chapter 4, Gazzaniga
    2. Tommasi, L, N Ford, and R J J Andrew. "Motor control by vision and the evolution of cerebral lateralization." Brain and language 73.2 (2000):220-35.
      Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    3. Coren S (1992) Handedness, traffic crashes, and defensive reflexes." American Journal of Public Health 82.8:1176-1177.
      Link to article in McMaster e-resources
  • CL1 Oct 19
    Boles, David B. "Lateralized spatial processes and their lexical implications." Neuropsychologia 40.12 (2002):2125-2135.
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Link to Andrea and Kevan's presentation: pdf
  • CL2 Oct 23
    Forster, J, Ronald SFriedman, and Jens Förster. "Effects of motivational cues on perceptual asymmetry: implications for creativity and analytical problem solving." Journal of personality and social psychology 88.2 (2005):263-275.
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Link to Dezi and Hasan's presentation: pdf
  • CL3 Oct 23
    Mneimne, Malek, et al. "Beyond arousal: Valence, dominance, and motivation in the lateralization of affective memory." Motivation and Emotion 39.2 (2015):282-292.
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Link to Ashley and Thipiga's presentation: pdf
  • CL4 Oct 26
    Mohamed, Saleh M H, et al. "Linking state regulation, brain laterality, and self-reported attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in adults." Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 38.8 (2016):831-843.
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Link to Rupinder and Shanthika's presentation: pdf

Topic 3: Emotion

Link to lecture outline: pdf, print-friendly pdf
Readings:
  • Oct 30 (Lecture)
    Chapter 10 in Gazzaniga textbook
  • EM1 Oct 30
    Lamm, Claus, C D D Batson, and Jean Decety. "The neural substrate of human empathy: effects of perspective-taking and cognitive appraisal." Journal of cognitive neuroscience 19.1 (2007):42-58.
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Link to Christiana and Sebastian's presentation: pdf
  • EM2 Nov 2
    Thomason, Moriah E, J P P Hamilton, and Ian H Gotlib. "Stress-induced activation of the HPA axis predicts connectivity between subgenual cingulate and salience network during rest in adolescents." Journal of child psychology and psychiatry 52.10 (2011):1026-1034.
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Link to Supriya and Asmaa's presentation: pdf
  • EM3 Nov 6
    Saunders, Blair, Achala H Rodrigo, and Michael Inzlicht. "Mindful awareness of feelings increases neural performance monitoring." Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience 16.1 (2016):93-105.
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Link to Marco and Mishaal's presentation: pdf
  • EM4 Nov 6
    Nicholson, Andrew A, et al. "The neurobiology of emotion regulation in posttraumatic stress disorder: Amygdala downregulation via real-time fMRI neurofeedback." Human brain mapping 38.1 (2017):541-560.
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Link to Kelsea and Rachel's presentation: pdf

Topic 4: Reward, decision-making and cognitive control

Link to lecture outline: pdf, print-friendly pdf
Readings:

Topic 5: Language

Link to lecture outline: pdf, print-friendly pdf,
Readings:
  • Nov 20 (lecture)
    1. Chapter 11 in Gazzaniga textbook
    2. Corballis, Michael C. "Mirror neurons and the evolution of language." Brain and Language 112(1):25-35. link to article in McMaster e-resources
    3. Iverson, J.M. and Goldin-Meadow, S. (2005), Gesture paves the way for language development, Psychological Science 16(5):367-371 link to article in McMaster e-resources
  • LA1 Nov 27
    Hirshorn, Elizabeth A, et al. "Decoding and disrupting left midfusiform gyrus activity during word reading." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 113.29 (2016):8162-8167.
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Note: When clicking on the link to the pdf of Hirshorn et al 2016, make sure to click on "PDF + SI" rather than just "PDF" so that you include the main (short) article plus supplementary info
    Link to Rebecca and Rocelyn's presentation: pdf
  • LA2 Nov 27
    Almairac, Fabien, et al. "The left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus subserves language semantics: a multilevel lesion study." Brain Structure and Function 220.4 (2015):1983-1995.
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Link to Virginia and Naga's presentation: pdf
  • LA3 Nov 30
    Federmeier, Kara D, et al. "Sounds, words, sentences: age-related changes across levels of language processing." Psychology and aging 18.4 (2003):858-872.
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Link to Yogisha and Kelsea's presentation: pdf
  • LA4 Dec 4
    Chang, Yu-Hsuan A, et al. "Multimodal imaging of language reorganization in patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy." Brain and language 170(2017):82-92.
    Link to article in McMaster e-resources
    Link to Gurleen and Leigh's presentation: pdf

Missed Presentations

If a student must miss a presentation due to illness, then as per McMaster's Policy For Absence from School Due to Illness or Compassionate Reasons "... you must bring appropriate documentation to the Office of the Associate Dean of Science (Studies) within one week of the original date of the missed work, and fill out the Request for Accommodation of Missed Academic Work form . For further details see http://www.science.mcmaster.ca/~associatedean/forms/missedwork.html.

In such cases, the student will be required to schedule an individual appointment with the instructors at an alternative time to give his/her presentation.

In addition, the student is asked to email the instructor and the teaching assistant, and your presentation partner if you have one, with as much advance notice as possible, because one of them will have to cover the student's missed presentation during the originally scheduled class time so that other students may still take part in the paper discussion.

Calculator requirement:

Calculators will not be required during tests.

Calendar Description

See http://registrar.mcmaster.ca/CALENDAR/current/pg1837.html#19326.

Academic integrity:

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity. Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: .Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty.), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university. It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at http://www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one.s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Notice of changes to course structure:

The university reserves the right to modify elements of the course during the term. The university may change the dates and deadlines for any or all courses in extreme circumstances. If either type of modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. It is the responsibility of the student to check their McMaster email and course websites weekly during the term and to note any changes."

The professor reserves the right to change any and all course requirements if the need should arise. Any change in the course requirements will be posted on the webpage and emailed to the class, and the details will be announced in class. Any concerns about announced changes should be addressed with the professor as soon as the changes are announced.


Related courses taught by Sue Becker

Psych 4BN3 - Cognitive Neuroscience II
Psych 734 - Neural network models of cognition and perception (graduate course)


Outline Last Revised: Sept 7, 2017.