People

Lorraine Allan

Lorraine G. Allan Memorial Garden
Dedicated September 20, 2013

Pictures taken on the day of the opening of the Lorraine G. Allan Memorial Garden

Pictures taken from the flute concert in the Lorraine G. Allan Memorial Garden

Lorraine Gloria Allan received her PhD at McMaster in 1968, and joined the faculty of the Psychology department in 1971. She was Chair of the Department from 1984-1989. Lorraine was an excellent undergraduate teacher, helping countless McMaster students appreciate the importance of quantitative thinking. She successfully mentored generations of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. She was a renowned researcher, and received many accolades for her innovative research contributions described in almost 100 articles in prestigious, rigorously refereed journals. Throughout her career at McMaster, and even into retirement, Lorraine had continuous research support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and often additionally from the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH).

In addition to her outstanding teaching and research accomplishments, Lorraine was a remarkable presence at McMaster throughout her 35-year career. Lorraine served on just about every important committee at McMaster. She served on the Science and Engineering Tenure and Promotion Committee. She was the Chair of Undergraduate Council. She was elected twice to Senate and twice to the Board of Governors. While on Senate, she was a member of Senate Executive and on two occasions chaired the Senate Committee on Appointments. For many years, she was the Chair of the Joint Senate/Faculty Association Drafting Committee that prepared various revisions of the McMaster University Policy and Regulations with Respect to Academic Appointment, Tenure and Promotion (the “Yellow Document”). Nobody knew that document better than Lorraine — she was the keeper of that sacred text. Lorraine played an active role in the McMaster University Faculty Association (MUFA).

She served on a variety of MUFA committees. In 1994/95 she was the President of MUFA, and then in 2002/03 she was (in an almost unprecedented move) again elected MUFA President. Lorraine was committed not only to McMaster, but also to the idea of the university. She truly believed that collegiality was the way to settle disagreements during negotiations, and vigorously defended this view against the arguments of her more cynical colleagues. Lorraine also appreciated the benefits of academic freedom. She readily spoke her mind, sometimes raising issues that the University Administration found uncomfortable. Those who served with her for a while learned that Lorraine knew her stuff, and, in controversial matters, she invariably was right. Lorraine got to the core of issues, and valued precision. She had little patience for clichéd mission statements, banal vision statements, or platitudinous directions documents. Lorraine loved the academic life, and she was the conscience of this University.

She understood that there are important differences between a university and a corporation. Because of her wide knowledge of McMaster, and her unceasing work on its behalf, she was widely respected by many for her advice and insights in many areas concerning the functioning of this University. Indeed, she had a hand in drafting many of the documents that form the basis of McMaster governance.

Lorraine's contributions to McMaster were recognized. She was inducted into the McMaster University Alumni Gallery in 2003, won the MUFA Outstanding Service Award in 2004, and the Dedicated Service Award of the Canadian Association of University Teachers in 2011. Lorraine's administrative skills, apparent at McMaster, attracted the attention of the wider scientific community. She served on the editorial boards of the premier journals in her discipline. She served as a member of a variety of research grant evaluation panels (NSERC, NIH). Indeed, she chaired the NSERC experimental psychology panel. She was on the executive board of many professional associations, and was elected President of some. In 2006 she received the Distinguished Leadership Award from the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour, and Cognitive Science.

Lorraine did all this — the administrative work (to McMaster and the profession), the research contributions, the contribution to education of others, the parenting and grand parenting, with great aplomb. I don't know how she did it. My other colleagues and I kvetched a lot more about our onerous work load than she did, even though we had much less on our plate. Lorraine continued her service to McMaster after her (then mandatory) retirement in 2006. She worked many hours updating the “Yellow Document.” She served as the McMaster University Retirees Association (MURA) Observer to the Board of Governors, MURA’s Liaison to MUFA, and a member of the Pension and Benefits Committee. In May 2012 Lorraine became a member of MURA Council and Chair of the Pension and Benefits Committee.

Remarkably, she continued to be very effective in this role even as her health and mobility deteriorated, and she had to run meetings by conference call. When Lorraine died on December 16, 2012, she made her final contribution to McMaster. She bequeathed her body to the McMaster University Education Program in Anatomy.

Shepard Siegel
Distinguished University Professor of Psychology,
Neuroscience & Behaviour (Emeritus)
MUFA President 1993/94

Contributions to Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour

Lorraine Allan's research has been influential in at least three areas: time perception, contingent aftereffects, and judgments of causal relationships. Her contributions to each of these topics are substantial, but even more important are the integrative themes, both within- and between each of these three areas, that she has delineated.

Early in her career at McMaster Lorraine applied the then quite new area of signal detection theory to understanding time perception in humans. Among her time-perception research are some intriguing papers on contingent temporal aftereffects. This interest in contingent aftereffects eventually encompassed contingent color aftereffects (the "McCollough effect"). The McCollough effect had usually been interpreted as evidence for adaptation of orientation-specific color detectors. However, Lorraine and her colleagues emphasized the similarity between the procedures used to establish contingent color aftereffects and the procedures used to establish a classically-conditioned response. This research borrowed concepts and findings from the animal learning literature, and demonstrated (in about 20 publications) that contingent color aftereffects are best understood as associative phenomena. She subsequently theorized that all contingent aftereffects (temporal, color, and others) are similar, in that they are manifestations of basic Pavlovian conditioning principles - - an intriguing and controversial conclusion.
Lorraine's appreciation of the learning literature was important in setting the stage for her contingency judgment research. In the early 1980s she published some papers (with Herb Jenkins) on judgments of causal relationships. This interest in causal judgments re-emerged when (a few years later) some suggested that the best way to understand many features of such judgments was to apply simple models of Pavlovian conditioning (such as the Rescorla-Wagner model). Likely as a result of her prior experience in integrating the animal learning literature with the contingent aftereffect literature, Lorraine got back into the causal judgment arena in a big way. Such judgments, she concluded in 1993, are best conceptualized as associative. To oversimplify just a little, the way we judge whether or not a food causes an allergic reaction is the same way that a rat judges whether or not a tone signals a shock.

Lorraine continued her contingency judgment research until shortly before her death. This latter work integrated Lorraine's very first research interest—signal detection theory—into the contingency judgment area. This reconceptualization of a causal judgment task as a signal detection task is an exciting area. In her last papers, she and her colleagues attempted to show how an appreciation of both signal detection theory and basic associative principles is necessary to understand how people make judgments of contingent relationships.

A Tribute To Lorraine Allan by Les King

Lorraine Allanʼs untimely death robbed the University of one of its more dedicated and exceptional faculty members.

An alumnus of McMaster (Ph.D.,1968), Lorraine spent all of her active career at this University as a member of the Psychology Department. In retirement she served as MURAʼS observer on the University Board and in 2012 became chair of its Pension and Benefits committee and a member of its Council.

Lorraine was an accomplished teacher, a respected researcher with more than 80 published papers in her name, and a wise and skillful participant in the administration of the University.

In the course of her career she served on and chaired every important committee of the Senate, chaired her department, served on the Board and was President of the Faculty Association in two separate years. As chair of Undergraduate Council she oversaw the approval and implementation of the Arts and Science Programme and as a member of numerous committees she was a principal framer and author of the Universityʼs appointments, tenure and promotion policy (the so-called ʻ Yellow Document ʼ). As recently as the past year she appeared before the Senate and Board both as a member of the subcommittee that developed the administrative leave policy and as the chair of a sub-committee charged with reviewing all of the supplementary policy statements of the ʻYellow Document.ʼ She was tireless in her committee work, always sensitive to the nuances of policy issues, and deeply committed to the goal of preserving collegial relations between the different parties within the university community.

Both the McMaster Faculty Association in 2004 and the Canadian Association of University Teachers in 2011 recognized her contributions with their Outstanding Service Awards. Yet she could never be persuaded to stand as a candidate for a deanship in which position she would have been superb. She cherished her role as a faculty member and now her colleagues cherish their memories of her.

- Les King, 2013

Academic History

1962 B.A. (Honour) Toronto (Psychology)
1963 M.A. Toronto (Psychology)
1968 Ph.D. McMaster (Psychology)
   
1968 - 1971 Research Associate.  Department of Psychology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario
1971 - 1975 Assistant Professor.  Department of Psychology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.
1975 - 1981 Associate Professor.  Department of Psychology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.
1981 - 2006 Professor.  Department of Psychology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.
2006 - 2012 Professor Emeritus. Department of Psychology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.
   
1984 - 1989 Chairman.  Department of Psychology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.
1978 Visiting Professor.  Department of Psychology, Stirling University, Bridge of Allan, Scotland.
1990 Visiting Professor.  Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tempe Arizona, USA.
1999 Green Professor.  Department of Psychology, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth Texas, USA.

Awards and Honours

2011 CAUT Award for Outstanding Service
2005 Fellow, Society for Experimental Psychology
2004 McMaster University Faculty Association Outstanding Service Award
2003 McMaster University Alumni Gallery
1999 Green Professorship in Psychology, Texas Christian University

Publications

Copyright Notice: Some of the documents listed below are available for downloading. These have been provided as a means to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work on a noncommercial basis. Copyright and all rights therein are maintained by the authors or by other copyright holders, notwithstanding that they have offered their works here electronically. It is understood that all persons copying this information will adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each author's copyright. These works may not be re-posted without the explicit permission of the copyright holder.

Hannah, S. D., Allan, L. G., & Young, M. E. (accepted).  Age differences in contingency judgement linked to perceptual segregation.  Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology.

Hannah, S. D., & Allan, L. G. (2011). The criterion-calibration model of cue interaction in contingency judgments. Learning & Behavior, 39, 171-190. [HannahAllan2011.pdf]

Heisz, J. J., Hannah, S. D., Shedden, J. M.,  & Allan, L. G. (2011).  Neural temporal dynamics of contingency judgment. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 4, 792-806. [Heisz etal.pdf]

Siegel, S., Allan, L. G., & Hannah, S. D. (2009). Applying Signal Detection Theory to contingency assessment. Comparative Cognition & Behavior Reviews, 4, 116-134. Retrieve from  http://psyc.queensu.ca/ccbr/index.html

Hannah, S. D., Crump, M. J. C., Allan, L. G., & Siegel, S. (2009). Cue-interaction effects in contingency judgments using the streamed-trial procedure. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology, 63, 103-112. [Hannah etal 2009.pdf]

Allan, L. G., Hannah, S. D., Crump, M. J. C., & Siegel, S. (2008). The psychophysics of contingency assessment. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 137, 226-243. [PDF]

Crump, M. J. C., Hannah, S. D., Allan, L. G., & Hord, L. K. (2007). Contingency judgments on the fly. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 60, 753-761. [PDF]

Hannah, S. D., Allan, L. G., & Siegel, S. (2007). The consequences of surrendering a degree of freedom to the participant in a contingency assessment task. Behavioural Processes, 22, 265-273. [PDF]

Allan, L. G, Siegel, S., & Hannah, S.  (2007).  The sad truth about depressive realism.  Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 60, 482-495.  [PDF]

Allan, L. G., Hannah, S. D., Crump, M. J. C., & Siegel, S. (2006). Psychophysics of causality: Detecting contingencies is like detecting signals (pp. 57-68).  In D. E. Kornbrot, R. M. Msetfi, & A. W. MacRae (Eds.),  Proceedings of the 22nd annual meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics. St Albans, England. [PDF]

Allan, L. G. (Ed.). (2005). Learning of contingent relationships [Special Issue]. Learning & Behavior, 33 (2).

Allan, L. G, Siegel, S., & Tangen, J. M.  (2005).  A Signal Detection analysis of contingency data.  Learning & Behavior, 33, 250-263. [PDF]

Allan, L. G., & Tangen, J. M.  (2005).  Judging relationships between events: How do we do it?  Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology, 59, 22-27. [PDF]

Tangen, J. M., Allan, L. G., & Sadeghi, H.  (2005).  Assessing (in)sensitivity to causal asymmetry: A matter of degree.  In A. J. Wills (ed.), New directions in human associative learning (pp 65-93).  NJ: Erlbaum. [PDF]

Tangen, J. M., & Allan, L. G. (2004). Cue-interaction and judgments of causality: Contributions of causal and associative processes.  Memory & Cognition, 107, 107-124. [PDF]

Allan, L. G., Tangen, J. M., Wood, R., & Shah, T. (2003). Temporal Contiguity and Contingency Judgments: A Pavlovian Analogue. Integrative Physiological and Behavioral Science, 38, 214-229. [PDF]

Tangen, J. M., & Allan, L. G. (2003). The relative effect of cue interaction. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 56B, 279-300.[PDF]

Allan, L. G. (2003). Assessing Power PC. Learning and Behavior, 31, 192-204. [PDF]

Allan, L. G. (2002). Are the referents remembered in temporal bisection? Learning and Motivation, 33, 10-31. [PDF]

Allan, L. G. (2002). The location and interpretation of the bisection point. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology B, 55, 43-60. [PDF]

Allan, L. G., & Siegel, S. (2002). A signal detection analysis of the placebo effect. Evaluation & the Health Professions, 25, 410-420. [PDF]

Allan, L. G., Balsam, P., Church, R. M., & Terrace, H. (2002). John Gibbon: Obituary. American Psychologist, 57, 436-437.

Allan, L. G., Church, R. M. (2002). Introduction. Learning and Motivation: Special Issue to honour the work of John Gibbon, 33, 9. [PDF1  PDF2]

Allan, L. G. (2001). Time perception models. In N. J. Smelser & P. B. Baltes (Eds.), International encyclopedia of the social and behavioral sciences (pp. 15696-15699). Pergamon, Oxford.

Allan, L. G., & Gerhardt, K. (2001). Temporal bisection with trial referents. Perception & Psychophysics, 63, 524-540. [PDF]

Allan, L. G. (2000). [Review of Time and the Dynamic Control of Behavior], American Journal of Psychology, 113, 455-458.

Allan, L. G. (2000). Time Perception. In A. E. Kazdin (Ed.), Encyclopedia of psychology. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.

Allan, L. G. (1998). The influence of Scalar Timing on human timing. Behavioural Processes, 44, 101-117. 

Penney, T. B., Allan, L. G., Meck, W. H., & Gibbon, J. (1998). Memory mixing in duration bisection. In D. A. Rosenbaum & C. E. Collyer (Eds.), Timing of behavior: Neural, psychological, and computational perspectives (pp. 165 - 193). Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

Siegel, S., & Allan, L. G. (1998). Learning and Homeostasis: Drug addiction and the McCollough effect. Psychological Bulletin, 124, 230-239.[PDF]

Allan, L. G. & Siegel, S. (1997). Contingent color aftereffects: Reassessing old conclusions. Perception & Psychophysics, 59, 129-141.

Allan, L. G. & Siegel, S. (1997). Assessing a new analysis of the McCollough effect. Cognition, 64, 207-222.

Allan, L. G., Siegel, S., Eissenberg, T., & Thomas S. E. (1997). More on the associative interpretation of the indirect McCollough effect. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 50B, 332-349.

Allan, L. G., Siegel, S., Kulatunga-Moruzi, C., Eissenberg, T., & Chapman, C. A. (1997). Isoluminance and contingent color aftereffects. Perception & Psychophysics, 59, 1327-1334.

Siegel, S., & Allan, L. G. (1996). The widespread influence of the Rescorla-Wagner model. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 3, 314-321.[PDF]

Eissenberg, T., Allan, L. G., Siegel, S, & Petrov, N. (1995). An associative interpretation of the indirect McCollough effect. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 48B, 262-286.

Allan, L. G., & Gibbon, J. (1994). A new temporal illusion or the TOE once again? Perception & Psychophysics, 55, 227-229.

Siegel, S., Allan, L. G., & Eissenberg, T. (1994). Scanning and form-contingent color aftereffects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 123, 91-94.

Allan, L. G. (1993). Human Contingency Judgments: Rule-Based or Associative? Psychological Bulletin, 114, 435-448. [PDF]

Allan, L. G. & Siegel, S. (1993). McCollough effects as conditioned responses. Reply to Dodwell and Humphrey. Psychological Review, 100, 342-346.

Allan, L. G. (1992). [Review of Cognitive models of psychological time], American Journal of Psychology, 141-145.

Allan, L. G. (1992). News on the internal clock. International Journal of Psychology, 27, 21 (abstract).

Allan, L. G. (1992). The internal clock revisited. In F. Macar, V. Pouthas, & W. Friedman (Eds.), Time, cognition, and action (pp. 191-202). Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Allan, L. G., & Siegel, S., & Linders, L. M. (1992). Cue-contingent adaptation to color. Learning and Motivation, 23, 288-305.

Siegel, S., & Allan, L. G. (1992). Pairings in learning and perception: Pavlovian conditioning and contingent aftereffects. In D. Medin (Ed.), The psychology of learning and motivation, Vol. 28 (pp. 127-160). San Diego CA: Academic Press.

Siegel, S., Allan, L. G., & Eissenberg, T. (1992). The associative basis of contingent color aftereffects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 121, 79-94.

Allan, L. G. & Gibbon, J. (1991). Human bisection at the geometric mean. Learning & Motivation, 22, 39-58.[PDF]

Allan, L. G. & Siegel, S. (1991). Characteristics of the indirect McCollough effect. Perception & Psychophysics, 50, 249-257.

Allan, L. G., Siegel, S., Toppan, P., & Lockhead, G. R. (1991). Assessment of the McCollough effect by a shift in psychometric function. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, 29, 21-24.

Siegel, S., Allan, L. G., Roberts, L., & Eissenberg, T. (1990). Spatial contingency and the McCollough effect. Perception & Psychophysics, 48, 307-312.

Allan, L. G., Siegel, S., Collins, J. C., & MacQueen, G. M. (1989). Color aftereffect contingent on text. Perception & Psychophysics, 46, 105-113.

Jacoby, L. L., Allan, L. G., Collins, J. C., & Larwill, L. K. (1988). Memory influences subjective experience: Noise judgments. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 14, 240-247.

Goddard, M., & Allan, L. G. (1988). A critique of Alloy and Tabachnik's theoretical framework for understanding covariation assessment. Psychological Review, 95, 296-298.

Allan, L. G., & Tirimacco, N. (1987). An orientation-contingent achromatic aftereffect. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, 25, 54-55.

Siegel, S., & Allan, L. G. (1987). Orientation-contingent color aftereffect: Contingency between orientation and chromatic stimuli. Perception & Psychophysics, 42, 281-285.

Gibbon, J. & Allan, L. G. (1987). Making Time. The Sciences, 2, 16.

Allan, L. G., & Siegel, S. (1986). McCollough effects as conditioned responses: Reply to Skowbo. Psychological Bulletin, 100, 388-393.

Siegel, S., & Allan, L. G. (1985). Overshadowing and blocking of the orientation-contingent color aftereffect: Evidence for a conditioning mechanism. Learning and Motivation, 16, 125-138.

Witherspoon, D., & Allan, L. G. (1985). Time judgments and the repetition effect in perceptual identification. Memory & Cognition, 13, 101-111.

Allan, L. G. (1984). Contingent aftereffects in duration judgments. In J. Gibbon & L. G. Allan (Eds.), Timing and Time Perception. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.

Gibbon, J., & Allan, L. G. (1984). (Eds.), Timing and Time Perception. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.

Allan, L. G. (1983). Magnitude estimation of temporal intervals. Perception & Psychophysics, 33, 29-42.

Allan, L. G., Darling, A. L., Hughes, R. C., & Rosenfeld, J. M. (1983). An examination of performance of first year students at an Ontario university: An admission perspective. The Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 13, 37-54.

Allan, L. G., & Jenkins, H. M. (1983). The effect of representations of binary variables on judgment of influence. Learning and Motivation, 14, 381-405.

Allan, L. G., & Hayman, C. A. G. (1982). Orientation-contingent color aftereffects: Retinal specificity. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, 19, 27-30.

Kristofferson, A. B., Allan, L. G., & Campbell, F. A. (1981). On the detection of stepwise changes in a constant signal level. Perception & Psychophysics, 30, 362-371.

Allan, L. G. (1980). A note on measurement of contingency between two binary variables in judgment tasks. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, 15, 147-149. [PDF]

Allan, L. G., & Jenkins, H. M. (1980). The judgment of contingency and the nature of the response alternatives. Canadian Journal of Psychology, 34, 1-11.

Hayman, C. A. G., & Allan, L. G. (1980). A reevaluation of angle-contingent color aftereffects. Perception & Psychophysics, 28, 61-67.

Allan, L. G. (1979). The perception of time. Perception & Psychophysics, 26, 340-354.

Allan, L. G. (1978). Comments on current ratio-setting models for time perception. Perception & Psychophysics, 24, 444-450.

Allan, L. G. (1978). The attention-switching model: implications for research in schizophrenia. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 14, 195-203.

Allan, L. G. (1978). The attention-switching model: Implications for research in schizophrenia. In L. C., Wynne, R. L., Cromwell, & S. Matthysse, (Eds.), The nature of schizophrenia: New approaches to research and treatment. Wiley.

Allan, L. G. (1977). The time-order error in judgments of duration. Canadian Journal of Psychology, 31, 24-31.

Allan, L. G., & Rousseau, R. (1977). Backward masking in judgments of duration. Perception & Psychophysics, 21, 482-486.

Allan, L. G. (1976). Is there a constant minimum perceptual duration? Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 28, 71-76.

Allan, L. G. (1975). Second guesses and the attention-switching model for successiveness discrimination. Perception & Psychophysics, 17, 65-68.

Allan, L. G. (1975). Temporal order psychometric functions based on confidence -rating data. Perception & Psychophysics, 18, 369-372.

Allan, L. G. (1975). The relationship between judgments of successiveness and judgments of order. Perception & Psychophysics, 18, 29-36.

Allan, L. G., & Kristofferson, A. B. (1974). Judgments about the duration of brief stimuli. Perception & Psychophysics, 15, 434-440.

Allan, L. G., & Kristofferson, A. B. (1974). Psychophysical theories of duration discrimination. Perception & Psychophysics, 16, 26-34.

Allan, L. G., & Kristofferson, A. B. (1974). Successiveness discrimination: two models. Perception & Psychophysics, 15, 37-46.

Allan, L. G., Kristofferson, A. B., & Rice, M. E. (1974). Some aspects of perceptual coding of duration in visual duration discrimination. Perception & Psychophysics, 15, 83-88.

Kristofferson, A. B., & Allan, L. G. (1973). Successiveness and duration discrimination. In S. Kornblum, (Ed.), Attention and Performance IV, Academic Press.

Allan, L. G., Kristofferson, A. B., & Wiens, E. W. (1971). Duration discrimination of brief light flashes. Perception & Psychophysics, 9, 327-334.

Kinchla, R. A., & Allan, L. G. (1970). Visual movement perception: A comparison of sensitivity to vertical and horizontal movement. Perception & Psychophysics, 8, 339-405.

Kinchla, R. A., & Allan, L. G. (1969). A theory of visual movement perception. Psychological Review, 76, 537-558.

Allan, L. G. (1968). Visual position discrimination: A model relating temporal and spatial factors. Perception & Psychophysics, 4, 267-278.



Proceedings

Allan, L. G., Hannah, S. D., & Siegel. S. (2009). Signal detection, aging, and contingency assessment. In Elliott, M. A., Antonijevic, S., Berthaud, S., Mulcahy, P., Martyn, C., Bargery, B., & Schmidt, H. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 25th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics, Galway, Ireland.

Allan, L. G., Hannah, S. D., Crump, M. J. C., & Siegel, S. (2008). More on the psychophysics of contingency assessment. In Schneider, B. A., Ben-David, B. M., Parker, S., & Wong, W. (Eds.). Proceedings of the 24th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics, Toronto, Canada: The International Society for Psychophysics.

Allan, L. G., Hannah, S. D., Crump, M. J. C., & Siegel, S. (2006). Psychophysics of causality: Detecting contingencies is like detecting signals (pp. 57-68).  In D. E. Kornbrot, R. M. Msetfi, & A. W. MacRae (Eds.),  Proceedings of the 22nd annual meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics. St Albans, England.

Allan, L. G., & Siegel, S. (2002). The placebo effect as an error. In Jose A. Da Silva, Elton H. Matsushima, & Nilton P. Ribeiro-Filho (Eds.), Proceedings of the eighteenth annual meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Editora Legis Summa Ltda.

Allan, L. G., Molino, T. A., & Siegel. S. (2000). Is there interocular transfer of the Achromatic McCollough Effect?. In C. Bonnet (Ed.), Fechner Day 2000: Proceedings of the sixteenth annual meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics. Strasbourg, France: Amalgame Impression.

Allan, L. G. (1999). Understanding the bisection psychometric function. In W. Uttal and P. Killeen (Eds.), Fechner Day 99: Proceedings of the fifteenth annual meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics. Tempe, Arizona: Arizona State University.

Allan, L. G. (1998). The influence of Scalar Timing on human timing research. In S. Grondin & Yves Lacoutre (Eds.), Fechner Day 98: Proceedings of the fourteenth annual meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics. Quebec City, Canada: Universite Lavel.

Allan, L. G., Siegel, S., Thomas, J. A., & Goodison, T. (1997). An attempt to obtain an inter-sensory contingent color aftereffect. In A. Preis & Tomasz Hornowski (Eds.), Fechner Day 97: Proceedings of the thirteenth annual meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics. Poznan Poland: Wydawnictwo Poznanskie. 

Allan, L. G. (1996). More on contingent duration aftereffects. In S. C. Masin (Ed.), Proceedings of the twelfth annual meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics. Padua Italy: University of Padua.

Allan, L. G. (1995). Psychological time: Continuous or discrete? In C.-A. Possamai (Ed.), Proceedings of the eleventh annual meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics. Cassis, France (pp. 133-138).

Allan, L. G. (1994). Overview: Past, present, and future. Proceedings of the tenth annual meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics. University of British Columbia.

Eissenberg, T., Allan, L. G., & Siegel, S. (1992). How indirect is the indirect McCollough effect? In G. Borg & G. Neely (Eds.), Proceedings of the eighth annual meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics (Supplement), 249-254. Stockholm University.

Allan, L. G., & Siegel, S., & Linders, L. M. (1991). Contingent adaptation to color. In G. R. Lockhead (Ed.), Proceedings of the seventh annual meeting of the international society for psychophysics. Duke University.


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