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Jim Dowling
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Associate Professor
Ivor Wynne Centre, Room 206
905 525 9140 ext. 23572
905-523-6011
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My area of specialization is the biomechanics of human movement. While this area of study attempts to solve both pure and applied problems in medical, occupational and sport settings, my research interests primarily involve the modelling and computer simulation of human movement. More specifically, I have focused on the prediction of individual muscle forces by using electromyography and segmental kinematics.

The ability to solve applied problems relies on our understanding of the human system, which is reflected by our ability to model it. By combining the measurement of muscular electrical activity with models of the mechanics of muscular contraction we are gaining insights into the internal forces produced by the human body. The prediction of individual muscle forces, therefore, allows a more complete understanding of the causes of applied movement problems such as injury mechanisms, movement efficiency, coordination of skilled performances, fatigue, design of prostheses and sporting equipment.

Undergraduate

Course Code
  Course Name
KINESIOL 3AA3   Biomechanics II
KINESIOL 4A03   Advanced Biomechanics
KINESIOL 4AA3   Applied Biomechanics

Dowling, J.J. (1992). The effect of muscle mechanics on human movement outcomes as revealed by computer simulation. Human Movement Science. 11:273-297.

Dowling, J.J., Konert, E., Ljucovic, P. and Andrews, D.M. (1994). Are humans able to voluntarily elicit maximum muscle force? Neuroscience Letters. 179:25-28.

Dowling, J.J. and Cardone, N. (1994). Relative cross-sectional areas of upper and lower extremity muscles and implications for force prediction. International Journal of Sports Medicine. 15:453-459.

Leedham, J.S. and Dowling, J.J. (1995). Force-length, Torque-angle, and EMG-joint angle relationships of the human in-vivo biceps brachii. European Journal of Applied Physiology. 70:421-426.

Dowling, J.J. (1997). The use of electromyography for the non-invasive prediction of muscle forces: Current issues. Sports Medicine. 24:82-96

Degree Specialty University Year
PhD Kinesiology University of Waterloo 1987
MHK Human Kinetics University of Windsor 1982
BHK Human Kinetics University of Windsor 1981
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McMaster University - Faculty of Science | Kinesiology