Partnership grant will improve the lives of people living with a disability

Kathleen Martin Ginis, Kinesiology, has received over $2.6 million from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) for a seven-year project to enhance the lives of Canadians living with a physical disability. Working with Steven Bray, Kinesiology, Catherine Connelly, DeGroote School of Business, and more than 50 partners – community-based disability-related service groups, government organizations at every level, non-profits and national charities, and university researchers – Martin Ginis will lead a team focused on developing and implementing evidence-based tools and services to assist Canadians with disabilities to achieve full participation in employment, sports and leisure and other areas. With nearly three million Canadians living with physical disabilities, this project has the potential to improve Canadian society profoundly.

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Paul Ayers presented Steacie Prize

Chemistry professor Paul Ayers formally received his Steacie Prize at a ceremony at McMaster in June 2014. The Steacie Prize is widely recognized as Canada's most prestigious award for scientists and engineers under the age of 40. Ayers is the third McMaster researcher to receive the Steacie Prize, and the first since 1975. His work in theoretical chemistry has also earned him two medals from prominent world associations and a Steacie Fellowship. You can watch Ayers' lecture, "Uncovering the Inner Lives of Electrons", delivered at the awards ceremony.

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Science grad transforms from patient to researcher

This summer Ben Diplock, a 2014 Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour graduate, will spend the summer working with Donald Mabbott at the Hospital for Sick Children, exploring whether physical exercise helps strengthen connections in the brains of those who have had brain tumours removed. Ben strongly suspects the answer is yes. He credits exercise as helping him to recover from life-saving surgery to remove a benign brain tumour conducted at the Hospital for Sick Children over 15 years ago.

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The Physics of Ice Cream

The Faculty of Science hosted an all-female group of 60 local grade 10 students last Friday. The girls spent the day learning about science with a visit to the McCallion Planetarium and conducting experiments including how to use liquid nitrogen, temperature -196 degrees celsius, to transform sugar and cream into ice cream.

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McMaster University | Faculty of Science